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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mayor Darriea Turley AM said Council is very pleased to be entering a new agreement with Rex that secures air transport to and from Broken Hill for the next five years.
"During negotiations, we stressed the importance of affordability for locals who use the service, and Rex has responded with the introduction of a low-cost Community Fare between Broken Hill and Melbourne, meaning we now have $199 flights between our three closest capital cities," said Mayor Turley.
Q: So maybe broken windows policing doesn't reduce crime per se.
PHOTO : castings work their way through shakeout, the sand mold is broken up and falls through the
PHOTO : broken up and sprues and risers removed (left).
"And as good as I think Broken Hearts Club is, its one person of color is, for me, its weakest character.
Compared with modern carnivores, the animals that died at Rancho La Brea had a far higher frequency of broken teeth.
The researchers also found a high proportion of broken teeth among ice age remains of dire wolves in Mexico and Peru, suggesting that this pattern occurred elsewhere, not just at Rancho La Brea.
In May and June, the crew and scientists on Leg 121 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) collected sediments from the top of a feature called Broken Ridge, which currently lies off the west coast of Australia and was half of the once-connected platform.
A new method of analyzing tiny pits and grooves on broken animal bones, developed by anthropologists at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., promises to help clarify questions about the proposed hunting and scavenging strategies used by human ancestors nearly 2 million years ago.