break

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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aprilia's new road-legal version of it's radical V-twin 450cc Enduro bike broke cover for the first time when it was raced in Italy.
THE most powerful current production Mercedes-Benz, the SL 55 AMG, broke cover at Frankfurt.
AFTER several months in the wilderness despised lion killer Walter Palmer finally broke cover as he returned to work this week.
The Lib Dem leader, who is so unpopular he has kept a low profile in the alternative vote campaign, broke cover to sing the praises of AV yesterday.
GLASVEGAS frontman James Allan broke cover in his hometown last night - to go on a booze bender with a Bunnyman.
Scotland defended manfully in the second half but, from the back of a lineout, Stringer broke cover, slalomed past a couple of blue shirts and found the rampaging Heaslip.
Backbenchers, discontented that Mr Prescott had been allowed to keep his Cabinet seat, his pounds 133,000 ministerial salary and two state-funded homes, broke cover after the publication of pictures showing him playing croquet on the lawn of his country retreat Dorneywood.
Daniel broke cover to draw the fire away from colleagues several times, including when they were treating a wounded friend, who sadly later died.