Broadside

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Broadside

A large piece of paper on which only one side has print. A broadside is used to make an announcement. It formerly was used as a common way to publish newspapers, though this is rare now. It is also called a broadsheet.
References in periodicals archive ?
And before that Barrie, founder and artistic director of Northern Broadsides, will direct the world premiere of For Love or Money, Blake Morrison's new adaptation of Alain Rene Lesage's French comedy Turcaret.
It's 23 years now since he set up Northern Broadsides with the remit of 'Northern voices, doing classical work in non-velvet spaces'.
Atkinson examines the thesis put forward in 2004 by William St Clair (in The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period) that the primary reason for the loss of many ballads from the broadside repertoire was the expiry in 1774 of the copyrights owned by their producers, and hence the loss of the monopoly that generated their profits.
It is a well-known feature of broadside studies that they are intrinsically interdisciplinary, and this volume confirms it with a vengeance.
Simpson provides a reference to the seventeenth-century manuscript that contains a few bars of the 'pleasant new tune' created for the song, which apparently gained some favour since it appeared on broadsides with other ballads.
It's fitting that Northern Broadsides should celebrate one of Shakespeare's best-loved comedies in the 400th anniversary of the playwright's death.
Some of the retelling is indulgently lengthy, while of course it's not all bawdy - there's also death, cruelty and the obligatory Broadsides clog-dancing involved too.
Of course, broadsides and songsters at large embraced a very disparate range of songs or verses, some of them topical and possibly only of restricted interest, some of them popular songs of their day.
What is more certain is that Northern Broadsides have devised a superb production of this strange play.
Hepburn misses other connections between broadsides and orality, for example in the cases of 'The Fancy Lad' (known in Scotland as 'The Lichtbob's Lassie') and 'The Hungry Army' (in the repertoire of Walter Pardon, who died in 1996).
THERE'S little doubt that Northern Broadsides will pack the Lawrence Batley Theatre later this month with its touring production of Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale.
Now Barrie Rutter and Northern Broadsides are heading back with not one, but two shows this season.