Broadside

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Broadside

A large piece of paper on which only one side has print. A broadside is used to make an announcement. It formerly was used as a common way to publish newspapers, though this is rare now. It is also called a broadsheet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Northern Broadsides, who regularly visit the Lawrence Batley Theatre in Huddersfield, also believes that a refresh of its website and up to date insight analysis on visitors - which tells them who and where their audiences have come from - has made the company a more attractive sponsorship proposition.
The name Northern Broadsides on a production is usually a stamp of quality and Hard Times is no different.
It is striking that the aged nostalgics of sixteenth-century broadsides are often highly politicised and critical of the status quo.
Williams argues in her fourth chapter that the visual and performative display of broadsides in early modern culture "was crucial to disseminating stereotypes of female transgression" (111).
The basic purpose of this book is to explore how witchcraft, and disorderly women more generally, were represented musically and textually in early modern England, in particular in broadside ballads.
The more than one dozen surviving broadsides and advertisements illustrated in this book provide us with a visual record of how the world viewed Shakers at this moment in time.
Continue reading "Slideshow: The Valmadonna Broadsides" at...
Many of the now 133 broadsides are breathtakingly beautiful and have incorporated lines from the poet al-Mutanabbi's verse or poems by contemporary Iraqi and American poets.
The new production, directed by Northern Broadsides artistic director Barrie Rutter, sees Charlotte, Anne and Emily Bronte living their lives brightly in a remote and grim northern town in the 1840s.
Northern Broadsides' haunting production, directed by Conrad Nelson, employs theatrical sleight of hand to conjure ghosts of the dead and demons of the mind, bringing to the stage an inventive and insightful take on the tortured Danish prince.
Another of Baskin's broadsides from the late sixties makes this point particularly.
Broadsides are large sheets of paper, usually the size of posters, printed with advertisements or announcements that were hung in public places.