Justice

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Related to bring to justice: do justice to, travesty of justice

Justice

The virtue by which each person is given what he or she deserves. For example, justice requires that an employee be paid for work done, or that a scofflaw be punished for his or her crimes. Justice is perhaps the most important concept in law. Many people seeking social change do so because they believe current systems are unjust in some way. For example, a socialist may believe it is unjust that a worker does not have the legal right to profit from the value he/she adds, while a capitalist may argue that it is unjust to deprive the owners of capital or other assets of their property.
References in periodicals archive ?
We encourage Pakistani authorities, as we have in similar cases in Pakistan and around the world, to swiftly investigate this crime and bring to justice those responsible," she added.
Two years ago Bulgaria's tax authorities found it difficult to bring to justice those tax evaders, who were revealed to hold about EUR 200 M in Swiss banks after a stolen disk of Swiss banking data was bought by Germany.
While at the United States Mission to the United Nations and then as Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, Scheffer was in the forefront of those fighting to create tribunals to bring to justice those responsible for some of the worst human right atrocities of since the Second World War.
Summary: Paris - France fully trusts the Moroccan authorities to carry out investigations into the Marrakech bombing and bring to justice the perpetrators of this "coward" attack, president Sarkozy said on Tuesday.
AaAaAa The human rights defense NGOAa "follows the situation of human rights in the region and maintains its constant position calling the international community to bring to justice the perpetrators of human rights breachesAa in the region", Sektaoui said.
A total of 321 people have been given secret identities since 2004 when the scheme was overhauled to help bring to justice the killers of New Year partygoers Letisha Shakespeare and Charlene Ellis.