break

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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Breaking down complex financial instruments into their fundamental components is not a new idea.
Through his work in movies, with the Velvet Underground, and in socializing, Andy Warhol's entire career is something made out of action; the work of Paul Thek, who opened the object's innards and installed his hippie body among the free fall of his endless accumulations, is apposite to everything going on; in terms of the dizzying breaking down of generic categories of "performance" and the "object" the radical interventions of, say, Jack Smith should have proved inescapable.
The unique chemistry of bogs helped to prevent Clonycavan Man's body from decaying, or breaking down, says Rolly Read, head of conservation at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin, where the body currently resides.
Terry Waldon, 54, breathed a sigh of relief after the lift in Raithwaite House, Wilton Lane, Guisborough, was repaired, three weeks after breaking down on January 13.
In the July 20 Energy & Fuels, Miller's group describes a method for breaking down polyethylene to make wax with the right molecular properties for conversion into lubricating oil.
The makes most prone to breaking down were Hotpoint and Hoover, while Bosch, Zanussi and Indesit came out on top for reliability, with fewer than a third suffering mechanical problems.