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Break

A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: Crash.

Break

1. A sudden, unexpected change in a security's price or in a market's value. While a break could indicate either upward or downward change, the connotation is negative. Especially on the futures market, a break means a steep decline in price, usually the result of a natural disaster affecting the underlying.

2. Less frequently, break refers to a discrepancy in a brokerage's accounting books.

break

1. A sharp price decline in a particular security or in the market as a whole. A break usually occurs when unexpected negative information is made public and investors rush to sell. Also called market break.
2. A discrepancy on the books of a brokerage firm.

break

1. To dissolve an underwriting syndicate.
2. See bust.
References in periodicals archive ?
They said that ship breaking is an old industry of Pakistan but it is facing a decline due to apathy of stakeholders.
Master Jones mentally prepared and empowered every single one of the students who took part in this seminar to mentally visualize themselves breaking through the brick.”
The final season of "Breaking Bad" is set to premiere on AMC this summer.
I then start working a breaking ball that starts in the middle of the plate and breaks outside the zone.
Such studies, however, haven't generally been designed to examine what happens during fragmentation, such as what specific forces impinge on various locations in a breaking object.
Today there is a cycle of violence in the Middle East desperately in need of breaking. David Schafer, in the second installment of his exploration into the origins of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, shows that irreconcilable differences and a consequent self-perpetuating system of mutual retaliation were established long enough ago to constitute a kind of modern tradition.
Normally, these weak points are small and do not represent an risk of the sheet breaking at normal tensions.
The first was called Breaking the Waves, a new film by Lars von Trier; it was scheduled to show at Cannes.
The larger the flaw, the more it reduces tensile strength and breaking elongation.
Breaking in the shank and box, whether under a hair dryer or through more conventional methods, is also important.
His teachers all called him "brilliant," but bored with normal adolescent preoccupations and unchallenged by school work, he was drawn to the one deed that required all of his staggering intellectual prowess: breaking into the most powerful computer system on earth.
2 : something produced by breaking <a bad break in the leg>