Breadwinner

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Breadwinner

The person who provides most or all of the income for his/her household. Stereotypically, the husband/father of a family is the breadwinner in the United States and other Western countries. However, the feminist movement in the mid-20th century and increases in the cost of living have resulted in many homes having two breadwinners. Other households have a single breadwinner of either sex out of choice or necessity.
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Their dual engagement with paid work and family work is why some scholars have argued for the continued importance of breadwinning (in some form or another) to fatherhood (Gerson, 1993; Lamb, 2000).
All of my research has focused on women and men who challenge traditional gendered norms and practices around breadwinning and care giving and has included varied foci on primary care-giving fathers, primary breadwinning mothers, fathers on parental leave, new immigrant fathers, and gay fathers.
(21) Historian Susan Glenn highlights how the ideal of "breadwinning partnerships" prevailed in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century shtetl, valorizing wives' paid work as a means of allowing husbands to study the Talmud.
(163) Robert Griswold's seminal historical account of fatherhood in America identifies breadwinning as the "great unifying element in fathers' lives" that shapes men's "sense of self, manhood, and gender." (164) Viewed through the lens of masculinities theory, providership allows men to reject the highly feminine attribute of dependency.
This definition of male breadwinning is constructed.
I suggest policies to promote such co-equal caregiving and breadwinning between men and women.
equal sharing by both spouses of caretaking and breadwinning
Youssef Bin Salim Al-Yahmadi, director of the social development department in Muscat said that these breadwinning projects aim at promoting the significance of work, increasing the family income, as well as, improving the living standards in addition to the social insurance salary.
Murphy, 'Breadwinning: Accounts of Work and Family Life in the 1950s.' Labour and Industry 12.3 (2002): 59-75; T.
The socio-cultural identification of masculinity with the breadwinning act spans historic milieus and transcend geographical and cultural boundaries.
The show's standard sitcom format - with its breadwinning husband, stay-at-home wife and unruly teenage kids - are as outmoded now as the haircuts.
These days I am grappling with Novel Number Two, juggling it with my 'real' baby--now three years old-and breadwinning with the gravitas of a mother in her thirties....