Branch

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Branch

An operation in a foreign country incorporated in the home country.

Branch

1. An office or subsidiary of a company that exists and conducts operations in a country other than the one in which the company is headquartered. See also: MNC.

2. A semi-independent office of a bank. For example, a bank may have five branches in a city where account holders can make deposits and withdrawals and conduct other business at the place most convenient for them.
References in periodicals archive ?
* More than 55 million credit union members have access to shared branching through their credit unions, which equals more than half of the 102 million U.S.
Located at the intersection of branching runner sections in a standard H-pattern runner, the MeltFlipper repositions the side-to-side flow variations by rotating the melt circumferentially about 90[degrees] at the first branch (Fig.
Noting that the FSLIC was a separate entity from the FHLBB, the Service determined "[u]nder the facts of this case" that the assistance agreement between the FSLIC and the taxpayer did not grant or promise the branching rights.
By repeating this sequence, each time taking steps to ensure that all component molecules of a new layer, or generation, form bonds only with the adjacent underlying layer, the chemists construct ever growing, branching molecules with concentric layers.
It thus appears that the branching has a much greater effect on green strength than carbon black.
Shared branching, specifically, holds the answer to both declining transactions in and increased cost of branches because this unique credit union network provides an income stream to the acquirers or branch owners.
(A) Is established or acquired outside the bank's home State pursuant to the interstate branching authority granted by the Interstate Act or by any amendment made by the Interstate Act to any other provision of law; or
Nothing represents this welcomed cooperation more than shared branching.
But they added that shared branching has also begun helping credit unions soften the blow of closing branches under the pressures of collapsing balance sheets.
offices of foreign banks by (1) limiting any new multistate branching activities to activities more comparable to those of U.S.