Brain Drain

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Brain Drain

A situation in which the smartest, best educated people in a society or country leave for elsewhere. For example, brain drain may occur if the best doctors in a country leave to work abroad. Brain drain can occur for any number of reasons. Common examples, however, include political instability, better career opportunities or simply higher salaries. Brain drain is a problem in many developing countries.
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Even the sixth working hypothesis was confirmed, with a high proportion of the respondents mentioning the healthcare system as among the most seriously affected fields of activity in our country, due to the phenomenon of brain-drain.
In your opinion, which is the most negative impact of brain-drain on our country?
1]; 5) a marginal change in skilled immigration raises institutional quality in a high (low) brain-drain country if the host country promotes (restricts) immigration; and 6) a high brain-drain country's institutional quality improves under a non-marginal reduction in skilled immigration, if the reduction is sufficiently large --with a maximum attained when the host country closes its border to potential immigrants--and worsens otherwise; and 7) improvements in information and communication technologies result in an improvement in institutional quality.
One policy implication is that a host country will succeed in its intent to help a low-income, high brain-drain country improve its institutional quality through a reduction in skilled immigration if the reduction is sufficiently large; otherwise, it is likely have a negative impact on that country's institutions.
Brain-drain refers to the immigration of technically trained professionals from one country to another.
However, not all influences of brain-drain are negative.
Linking students and employers, One of the most Common themes of Indiana's brain-drain fixes is strengthening ties between students and employers.
Charlie Nelms, vice president for student development and diversity at Indiana University, says IU also is putting added emphasis on such things as internships, career planning and placement as part of its brain-drain effort.
This brain-drain story seems plausible to Canadians because it perpetuates the myth that we are vastly overburdened by taxation, especially compared to Americans.
WHILE some continue to milk the brain-drain story for their own purposes, almost no attention is being paid to a related issue that poses a genuine threat to Canada's well-being.