Brain Drain

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Brain Drain

A situation in which the smartest, best educated people in a society or country leave for elsewhere. For example, brain drain may occur if the best doctors in a country leave to work abroad. Brain drain can occur for any number of reasons. Common examples, however, include political instability, better career opportunities or simply higher salaries. Brain drain is a problem in many developing countries.
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He said: 'All we need for the brain-drain in the health sector is more motivation from the government, the government should provide better conducive working environment for us
Over the past few years, an important element of the international migration and of the ever-growing phenomenon of "brain-drain" was the studets' migration.
It follows from these results that a host country intent on helping a low-income, high brain-drain country (where m > [m.sub.1]) through a reduction in skilled immigration is likely to have a negative impact on the low-income country's institutions, if the reduction is insufficiently large.
The supply-demand component of staffing is only one constituent of brain-drain. Another constituent is migration of nurses to this country, which often is treated with indifference as it is perceived simply as an American tradition to hire foreign workers.
As Frankie tries to uncover the secrets of the school, he discovers the headmaster, Dr Gore, has plans to turn all the students into robot-like super brains using his Brain-drain machine.
The survey also asked workers what companies could do to avoid a brain-drain of their best talents.
The quaint 60s notion of "brain-drain" I understood to be when the highest qualified leave, not don't actually arrive.
"Graduates are a real asset to the business community and it is vital that we - as a region - do everything we can to ensure that we do not suffer a brain-drain."
This "brain-drain" has been raising alarm for quite some time.
So from this perspective, these Nigerian doctors working abroad represent a "brain-drain".
Africa's 'brain-drain' annually claims about 70,000 medical professionals seeking better pay and conditions in the healthcare sectors of the UK, other parts of Europe and the US.
Perhaps even more encouraging is the response that followed the 1999 brain-drain warning.