block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
A prospective, randomized comparison between ultrasound and nerve stimulation guidance for multiple injection axillary brachial plexus block. Anesthesiology 2007;106(5):992-6.
Comparison of dexmedetomidine and clonidine (alpha2 agonist drugs) as an adjuvant to local anaesthesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A randomised double-blind prospective study.
Ultrasound does not shorten the duration of procedure but provides a faster sensory and motor block onset in comparison to nerve stimulator in infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Korean J Anesthesiol 2013; 64: 327-33.
In the present study, we studied the intraoperative and postoperative anaesthesia effects of two adjuvants added to ropivacaine in a USG-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. When local anaesthesia is used solely, they have a shorter duration of action (6).
Sermeus et al., "Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks: review and current practice," Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica, vol.
Second, the location of the infraclavicular brachial plexus block is important.
This was supported by study of Esmaoglu et al., which stated that when dexmedetomidine added to levobupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block, it shortens the onset time of both sensory and motor block, prolongs the duration of block and duration of post-operative analgesia.
Several studies have demonstrated that ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blocks allow significant reductions in the use of supplementary analgesics and provide better quality of blocks compared with the nerve stimulator-guided technique.11
Shrestha et al., "Comparative study between tramadol and dexamethasone as an admixture to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block," Journal of the Nepal Medical Association, vol.
These data permit the precise introduction of the needle into the fascicles without causing puncture of the axillary artery and chest wall, which is important to accomplish brachial plexus block below the level of the clavicle (Gusmao et al.).
Supraclvicular brachial plexus block is a preferred and safe technique for providing rapid and reliable anaesthesia in upper extremity surgery that does not involve shoulder.1,2 It has the advantage of minimizing intraoperative haemodynamic changes and providing postoperative pain relief thus promoting early recovery and discharge.3 In peripheral nerve blocks, bupivacaine is used frequently due to its prolong duration of action.4