Bounty

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Bounty

A payment a local government or a bail bondsman gives to an individual who finds, arrests and takes a fugitive to jail. A bounty helps ensure that the government or bail bondsman recovers at least part of the bail owed if a person fails to come to a court date.
References in periodicals archive ?
From 1837 to 2006, the state legislature passed or amended laws relative to bounties on a frequent basis, with at least 50 laws enacted to finetune the program.
Bounties can be private, enlisting hackers only by invitation, or open to the public where anyone can join the hack attack.
So, if you're looking to maximize your bounties, focus on quality over quantity.
For example, the export bounties for the 1708-9 fishing season did not amount to more than 500 [pounds sterling].
With Dodd-Frank, this could mean equally staggering bounties for whistleblowers who report FCPA violations.
Kohn notes that the False Claims Act (FCA), which awards bounties to whistleblowers who report fraud by government contractors, has recovered some $25 billion in fraudulent billings by corrupt vendors since it was enacted in 1863, while paying out some $2.5 billion in bounties.
You will need to ride your luck to knock out one of the bounties because they will have strong hands when a big pot develops.
The only way a player could collect his own bounty was to win the Main Event tournament, and he would have to go undefeated throughout the event to collect both of his assigned bounties. Prior to the tournament draw, the bounties were assigned to Aaron Aragon, Bill Frisby, Bob Calderon, Craig Welsh, and Jeff Dolezal.
"Bounties may seem like a drastic step but the seriousness of the current situation cannot be under-estimated.
All five work in the areas in which the bounties were posted, and three of them submitted their own or their companies' publications.
[137] Organizations such as Amnesty International may be willing to spearhead private collection efforts to raise bounties for war criminals.