Bounce

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Bounce

A check returned by a bank because it is not payable, usually because of insufficient funds. Also used in the context of securities to refer to the rejection and ensuing reclamation of a security; a stock price's abrupt decline and recovery.

Bounce

1. To not pay a check because there are insufficient funds in the payer's account. For example, suppose Joe writes a check to Bob for $500, but there is only $400 in Joe's checking account. When Bob deposits the check, his bank will refuse to credit the $500 to his account, because Joe's bank will advise that Joe does not have enough money to honor the check. In such a situation, the check is said to bounce.

2. An increase in a security's price following a period of flat or downward performance. A bounce can occur when the company or an analyst announces favorable news.

bounce

Upward movement in the price of a security following a period of price stability or price declines. For example, a stock might get a nice bounce because of a favorable comment from an influential analyst.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can enjoy the same fitness benefits by keeping those feet together and just bouncing as the springs in a trampoline take away all the impact of the road.
NASA even agrees that bouncing is "the most efficient and effective exercise yet devised by man".
"We will be bouncing on 4x4ft boards that will automatically count our number of bounces in real time, so people can track our progress online."
Rodriguez said the bill requires the drawee bank of a bouncing check to divulge the signatory or signatories upon written request of the payee even if the case is not yet filed in court.
The Cystic Fibrosis Trust is asking people to sign up for the massive jump and hopes to get one million people bouncing on the same day.
Ministry officials told local Arabic daily Al Eqtisadiya that more Saudi nationals would be named and shamed as part of a new aggressive campaign to curb the phenomenon of bouncing cheques that has hit the Saudi economy.
In recent times the UAE's financial services community and leading politicians have been discussing the need for reforms relating to cheque bouncing in the country.
The aim is to get 2,000 people bouncing on the famous 1970s toy simultaneously for one minute.
The Dubai Cassation Court has refused a petition by British businessman Safi Qurashi to quash a final conviction for bouncing a $1.9m cheque.
The number of bouncing checks in Saudi banks fell by 54 percent in the first quarter of 2012 to reach 10,575 compared to 23,212 checks in Q1, 2011, according to a report by Saudi Credit Bureau (SIMAH).
Mathieu flails in a time zone of his own when bouncing up and down to a melody, unlike people who don't dance particularly well but generally move in sync with a musical beat, according to a team led by psychologists Jessica Phillips-Silver and Isabelle Peretz, both of the University of Montreal.
As the book's subtitle suggests, turning tough times into triumph is at the heart of "bouncing," a concept McFarland illustrates through a multilayered, modern-day fable about Mike Maloney and his efforts to shore up and reinvigorate the corporate division he leads.