Bounce

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Bounce

A check returned by a bank because it is not payable, usually because of insufficient funds. Also used in the context of securities to refer to the rejection and ensuing reclamation of a security; a stock price's abrupt decline and recovery.

Bounce

1. To not pay a check because there are insufficient funds in the payer's account. For example, suppose Joe writes a check to Bob for $500, but there is only $400 in Joe's checking account. When Bob deposits the check, his bank will refuse to credit the $500 to his account, because Joe's bank will advise that Joe does not have enough money to honor the check. In such a situation, the check is said to bounce.

2. An increase in a security's price following a period of flat or downward performance. A bounce can occur when the company or an analyst announces favorable news.

bounce

Upward movement in the price of a security following a period of price stability or price declines. For example, a stock might get a nice bounce because of a favorable comment from an influential analyst.
References in periodicals archive ?
His conclusion: "The ball today doesn't bounce any more than the ball from 1987."
"We are encouraging families, youth groups, schools and friends to organise their own Big Poppy Bounce event before the end of the month.
'Now, if I drop it from this height (waist high on child) we are going to see how high it bounces up on Stephanie'.
Most bounce houses are made of a stretchy material called vinyl (VY-nuhl).
The group were pictured engaging in some "synchronised jumping" in order to get the bridge to bounce more than it might normally.
Jack aims to bounce into the record books during a head-to-head at next month's extreme pogo world championships, dubbed Pogopalooza, in Philadelphia.
The researchers conclude that the bounces increase because the zinc oxide forms tiny bridges within the zinc material, which decreases the mechanical damping of the battery.
PEOPLE will be attempting to bounce into the record books in Huddersfield this weekend.
Any individual who writes a cheque with insufficient funds - causing the same to bounce - can face imprisonment of one month to three years, or a fine of a minimum of Dh1,000.
So far, 2008 looks more like 2004 than earlier elections in terms of pre-convention voter interest levels, and if the convention bounces of 1964 through 2000 were largely a product of low pre-convention levels of voter attention, then there may not be big surges in candidate support this year.
Some are soft, some are firm, some can bounce really high, others float--and don't forget the badminton birdie, where the ball is just on the bottom.
If history repeats (or merely rhymes) and my suggested scenario unfolds (i.e., the market bounces further and goes into long-term consolidation before entering the next secular bull market), the move to the previous historical high will be from a higher plateau.