bottom

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Bottom

Refers to the base support level for market prices of any type. Also used in the context of securities to refer to the lowest market price of a security during a specific time-frame.

Market Bottom

The lowest level of support in price for a security, index, or market over a given time frame. The security, index, or market is highly unlikely to go below the bottom; if it does so, it may cause panic selling. During a prolonged bear market, when a market is dropping more or less continuously for a long time, investors often question when the market will find bottom, which means that they wish to know when the market will begin to rise again, or at least stabilize.

bottom

The lowest price to which a stock, market index, or another asset will sink. Compare top.
References in classic literature ?
Our friends held on to the sofas as long as they could, but when the Gump caught on a proJecting rock the Thing stopped suddenly -- bottom side up -- and all were immediately dumped out.
So he commanded Tip to take off Jack's head and lie down with it in the bottom of the nest, and when this was done he ordered the Woggle-Bug to lie beside Tip.
When the sailor withdrew his hand and looked at the piece of money within, he dropped fainting to the bottom of the boat.
Clayton heard the man shuffling about in the bottom of the boat.
Again Clayton essayed to stagger on to meet his fate, but once more he pitched headlong to the boat's bottom, nor, try as he would, could he again rise.
A town built at the bottom of this circular cavity would have been utterly inaccessible.
Indeed, nature had not left the bottom of this crater flat and empty.
He died two years afterwards, still raving about the treasures that lie at the bottom of the sea.
This is that portion, also, where in the spring, the ice being warmed by the heat of the sun reflected from the bottom, and also transmitted through the earth, melts first and forms a narrow canal about the still frozen middle.
The water is so transparent that the bottom can easily be discerned at the depth of twenty-five or thirty feet.
The shore is composed of a belt of smooth rounded white stones like paving-stones, excepting one or two short sand beaches, and is so steep that in many places a single leap will carry you into water over your head; and were it not for its remarkable transparency, that would be the last to be seen of its bottom till it rose on the opposite side.
At first you wonder if the Indians could have formed them on the ice for any purpose, and so, when the ice melted, they sank to the bottom; but they are too regular and some of them plainly too fresh for that.