Bottle

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Bottle

A British slang term for either 2 pounds or 200 pounds. The term derives from "bottle of glue," which rhymes with two. It is an example of Cockney rhyming slang.
References in classic literature ?
Anatole kept on refilling Pierre's glass while explaining that Dolokhov was betting with Stevens, an English naval officer, that he would drink a bottle of rum sitting on the outer ledge of the third floor window with his legs hanging out.
Here he broke off to tilt to his mouth the opened bottle Kwaque handed him.
Let me see," said Margolotte; "of those qualities she must have 'Obedience' first of all," and she took down the bottle bearing that label and poured from it upon a dish several grains of the contents.
In that repository I found the bottle which I now produce.
Quite unmoved, however, Newman left him to sip his own at leisure, or to pour it back again into the bottle, if he chose, and departed; after greatly outraging the dignity of Peg Sliderskew by brushing past her, in the passage, without a word of apology or recognition.
Upon this I made an effort to get up, in order to put my threat into execution; but the ruffian just reached across the table very deliberately, and hitting me a tap on the forehead with the neck of one of the long bottles, knocked me back into the arm-chair from which I had half arisen.
The planks, which had not been swabbed since the mutiny, bore the print of many feet, and an empty bottle, broken by the neck, tumbled to and fro like a live thing in the scuppers.
She drew a mug into the bed, and sat for a while considering which of the two bottles she should choose.
No other water was at hand except that in the two bottles.
It won't be the first time I've dined off a bottle of beer, and my mind's never clearer than when I do.
Pickwick, looking round at his companion, with the bottle in his hand.
He would seem to have been 'cleaning himself' with the aid of a bottle, jug, and tumbler; for no other cleansing instruments are visible in the bare brick room with rafters overhead and no plastered ceiling, into which he shows his visitor.