Borrow

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Borrow

To obtain or receive money on loan with the promise or understanding that it will be repaid.

Borrow

To receive money from another party with the agreement that the money will be repaid. Most borrowers borrow at interest, meaning they pay a certain percentage of the principal amount to the lender as compensation for borrowing. Most loans also have a maturity date by which time the borrower must have repaid the loan. Borrowing occurs informally from family and friends, at the retail level through a bank, and also on a large scale involving governments and institutional investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the first half of the current fiscal, the government decided to borrow Rs 2.88 lakh crore as compared to Rs 3.72 lakh crore in the same period of FY18.
a Brian Brown, head of insight (banking and general insurance) at Defaqto, says: "Interest goes up and down as the amount you borrow increases.
Borrows stepped down as CFO after approximately 20 months in that position.
For persons and enterprises engaged in very small businesses who do not have access to working capital, it may still make sense to borrow through the informal sector after calculating how much they can make even after the servicing of what they borrow.
Example 2: The facts are the same as in Example 1, except that D borrows from X to start an LLC with an unrelated person.
John Borrows (2) writes about Aboriginal legal issues and perspectives at a dynamic and, he suggests, critical time in the history of relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada.
The policy had reached a point at which it was "overloaned," which means the woman could no longer borrow against the policy to pay the premiums and loan interest.
That is, I, = 1 if the bank borrows from the central bank in period t and [I.sub.t] = 0 if the bank does not borrow in the period.
"My client didn't borrow the ladder, he bought it."
The Board generally incurs a potential liability to the FDIC if an undercapitalized institution borrows for more than 60 days in any 120-day period.(3) This liability provision may be suspended for a 60-day period if the head of the institution's primary federal regulator certifies in writing to the Federal Reserve that the institution is viable.
Most of the difference occurs because our government prefers not to count money it borrows from its own retirement trust funds as debt," or interest it pays to these trust funds for past borrowings as an expense,