Borrow

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Borrow

To obtain or receive money on loan with the promise or understanding that it will be repaid.

Borrow

To receive money from another party with the agreement that the money will be repaid. Most borrowers borrow at interest, meaning they pay a certain percentage of the principal amount to the lender as compensation for borrowing. Most loans also have a maturity date by which time the borrower must have repaid the loan. Borrowing occurs informally from family and friends, at the retail level through a bank, and also on a large scale involving governments and institutional investors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The statistics revealed the most borrowed book of adult non-fiction was the The Official Driver Theory Test.
On October 29, 2008, Norinchukin Bank borrowed $6 billion (Source: Bloomberg)
Borrowed car, borrowed girl, Jaguar, took her for a whirl.
The counterparty was required to pay a fee to the taxpayer for borrowing the pledged stock and was required to make in-lieu-of payments to the trustee equal to any dividends or other distributions received with respect to the borrowed shares.
During its investigation, the IRS "traced" the company's borrowed funds to several of its dividend-paying stock purchases and then invoked section 246A to reduce the corporation's dividends-received deduction.
The figure indicates, however that the corporate sector in Japan, which had borrowed and invested as much as 9 percent of GDP back in the early 1990s, has been in financial surplus since 1998.
But have consumers borrowed more than they can handle?
The ages of the respondents ranged from 25 to 47 and the amount borrowed ranged from $2,000 to $60,000.
This structure can accelerate a company's cash flow by allowing it to borrow against the future value of its current assets that are expected to become cash in the near term, in turn, using the borrowed funds to finance working capital.
In Clayton W Plotkin (TC Memo 2001-71) an attorney borrowed money from his professional corporation's pension plan.
Thus, if an insurance policy is pledged as part of the collateral for a loan, the interest deductions will come within this exception if the taxpayer can show that the amounts borrowed were actually used to finance the expansion of inventory or other similar business needs.
At a later date you will have to buy the same number of shares to replace the stock you borrowed.