Boondoggle

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Boondoggle

A large, expensive project of no particular use. It especially refers to squandering government or corporate money. The term refers to perceived wasteful recreational activities provided to the unemployed during the New Deal in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
That would only lead to indignant letters and phone calls from outraged constituents who for some reason just don't appreciate the necessity of all the pork barrels, boondoggles, and other wacky capers that make a job in the upper echelons of the federal government more fun than a barrel of monkeys.
Of the money that Peru did invest, most went into middle-class housing, highways, or boondoggles like the giant Majes irrigation scheme.
United Teachers of Los Angeles has been pointing out bureaucratic boondoggles in the Los Angeles Unified School District for years.
A: I'll put it in mathematical terms: As the program expands arithmetically, the number of boondoggles will increase geometrically.
Here, as with his support of the boondoggles, Wright is out of touch with the more thoughtful elements of his party.
Governmental red tape and boondoggles have delayed the local home'sconstruction for more than 10 years and this MOU between the two majorfactions is a move in the right direction,'' said Craft.
Spending billions on light-rail boondoggles or forcing employers and employees to participate in ride-sharing programs doesn't address the changing needs of workers.
No more stadiums, Belmonts and other exalted boondoggles that have little to do with basic populace services.
His pride governs his actions, and his pride demands that the worst of many LAUSD boondoggles be redeemed on his watch.
We also pay - and will continue to pay for many years to come - for the downtown renovation, the face lift for Los Angeles City Hall, the Belmont fiasco, the subway system that has only two stops in the Valley and many other boondoggles that, even if they were successful, would not benefit the Valley residents at all.
And so for a generation, the city's neighborhoods have been bled dry, shelling out massive tax outlays to pay the salaries of the highest-paid public officials in the country and underwriting some of the most expensive boondoggles.
And they stress that contractors have done little to improve government efficiency and service, noting such boondoggles as the recent loss of thousands of tax returns and payments by a Pittsburgh bank that was under contract to the Internal Revenue Service.