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Book

A banker or trader's positions.

Book

1. An informal term for an accounting record such as an income statement. See also: Cook the books.

2. A general term for a record of any sort.

3. See: Subscribe.

book

1. A specialist's information on limit orders to buy and sell the security in which the specialist makes a market. The orders are left by other exchange members who wish to trade at a price that differs from the current market price. The book provides the specialist with an estimate of the demand for and supply of the stock in which he or she is a market maker. Also called specialist's book.
3. An organization's written accounting record.
4. An underwriting syndicate's record of activity for a new security issue.

book

In accounting, to recognize a transaction by recording an entry. For example, a financial institution books a loan when it lends money to a customer.
References in classic literature ?
"This book," said the barber, opening another, "is the ten books of the 'Fortune of Love,' written by Antonio de Lofraso, a Sardinian poet."
"These three books," said the curate, "are the best that have been written in Castilian in heroic verse, and they may compare with the most famous of Italy; let them be preserved as the richest treasures of poetry that Spain possesses."
Being a woman, however, I opened the book without a moment's hesitation.
I put down the book, disgusted with the creatures who had assisted in filling it, and then took it up again, by an afterthought.
His library, in addition to numerous works on philosophy and the fine arts, was composed of standard books of all classes, including, of course, a proportion of nautical literature.
The errors of the South Sea missions are pointed out with even more force than in 'Typee,' and it is a fact that both these books have ever since been of the greatest value to outgoing missionaries on account of the exact information contained in them with respect to the islanders.
Often, too, Pokrovski would give me books. At first I read them merely so as to avoid going to sleep, but afterwards I examined them with more attention, and subsequently with actual avidity, for they opened up to me a new, an unexpected, an unknown, an unfamiliar world.
Finally, I decided to give him books. I knew that he had long wanted to possess a complete set of Pushkin's works, in the latest edition; so, I decided to buy Pushkin.
Nevertheless our old game with the haver of a thing, as she called it, was continued, with this difference, that it was now she who carried the book covertly upstairs, and I who replaced it on the shelf, and several times we caught each other in the act, but not a word said either of us; we were grown self-conscious.
(and obviously scarcely anyone had read it) it seemed absolutely clear that the whole book was nothing but a medley of high-flown phrases, not even--as suggested by marks of interrogation--used appropriately, and that the author of the book was a person absolutely without knowledge of the subject.
As for Owen Ford, the "Margaret" of his book, although she had the soft brown hair and elfin face of the real girl who had vanished so long ago, "pillowed where lost Atlantis sleeps," had the personality of Leslie Moore, as it was revealed to him in those halcyon days at Four Winds Harbor.
Jones opened the book a hundred times during their walk, kissed it as often, talked much to himself, and very little to his companions.