cell

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Related to bone cell: bone marrow cell, cartilage cell

cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
When traditional implants are fixed into bone marrow, the marrow's stem cells do not receive messages from the body to differentiate into bone cells, which would help create a stronger bond between the implant and the bone.
Artificial grafts offer an easier and less risky process, providing an artificial scaffold on which bone cells can grow.
For instance, proteins produced by bone cells modulate testosterone release from the testes, suggesting a possible role in reproductive biology.
A critical and distinguishing feature of the present invention are defined tissue culture conditions and factors resulting in the formation of bone cell spheroids.
Previously, Thomas Webster, assistant professor at Purdue, had shown that nanometer scale (~100-nm) bumps on the surface of titanium create a better surface for bone cell adhesion within implants (see R&D, Jan 2004 pg.
This resulted in the formation of bone cell spheroids and microspicules-small bone fragments-within 24-48 hours.
The study showed that NELL-1 works by activating the cellular signaling pathway that regulates whether a stem cell differentiates into a bone cell or a fat cell.
Jan 16, 2015 (SeeNews) - Belgian bone cell therapy company Bone Therapeutics announced Friday plans to list its shares on the stock exchanges of Brussels and Paris.
The study is the first example of using bone cell progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells to grow compact bone tissue in quantities large enough to repair centimeter-sized defects.
Increased bone cell deposition Following that logic, the scientists transformed nanopowders into a functional material to analyze for bone growth.
Studies have also shown that lead exposure may increase the risk of developing osteoporosis by "inhibiting activation of vitamin D, the uptake of dietary calcium [to the bones], and aspects of bone cell function," states an EPA-sponsored report, Exploration of Aging & Toxic Response Issues, released in February 2001.
These foods are broken down into sugar by the body, causing levels of insulin to rise and releasing stressor hormones, which wreak havoc with the bone cell renewal process.