Barrier

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Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
MIT engineers have now developed a tissue model that mimics beta-amyloid's effects on the blood-brain barrier, and used it to show that this damage can lead molecules such as thrombin, a clotting factor normally found in the bloodstream, to enter the brain and cause additional damage to Alzheimer's neurons.
They used these special cells to make neurons, blood-vessel linings and support cells that together make up the blood-brain barrier.
They used these special cells to make neurons, blood-vessel cells, and support cells that together make up the blood-brain barrier. The team then placed the various types of cells inside microfluidic chips, which mimicked the body's environment and allowed the cells to interact with each other and with blood.
Freskgard is one of the world's leading experts on mechanisms that increase the passage of biologic drugs across the blood-brain barrier.
Their study, titled 'Inducing a Transient Increase in Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability for Improved Liposomal Drug Therapy of Glioblastoma Multimore,' was published online last December by the Washington-based journal ACS Nano.
'That was surprising that this blood-brain barrier breakdown is occurring independently.'
The blood-brain barrier is a network of vascular and brain cells that help to safeguard the brain and regulate the flow of substances into and out of it, according to a University of Maryland Medicine release.
Nir Lipsman, M.D., of the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre at the University of Toronto, and colleagues say that magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound, when combined with injected microbubbles, transiently opens the blood-brain barrier with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity.
It would cross the blood-brain barrier more efficiently, and thus in principle, would require a smaller dose to achieve therapeutic effects in the brain.
Now researchers from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institute in Sweden present in the journal Nature a detailed molecular atlas of the cells that form the brain's blood vessels and the life-essential blood-brain barrier. The atlas provides new knowledge regarding the functions of the cells and the barrier, and clues to which cell types are involved in different diseases.
Actually getting drugs inside the brain has proven difficult due to the blood-brain barrier, but MiNDS could allow physicians the ability to deliver drugs right where they're needed most.