Donor

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Donor

One who gives property or assets to someone else through the vehicle of a trust.

Donor

A person or institution who gives assets to another person or institution, either directly or through a trust. Under most circumstances, donors can deduct the value (or depreciated value) of the assets given from their taxable income. While many donors give out of the goodness of their hearts, many do so in order to avoid taxes, especially when donating through a trust.

donor

One who gives a gift.

References in periodicals archive ?
HIV, HCV, HBV and syphilis rate of positive donations among blood donations in Mali: lower rates among volunteer blood donors.
BLOOD donors are being urged to come forward and save lives following a stark decline in givers.
Regular voluntary unpaid blood donors are the foundation of a safe blood supply because they are associated with low levels of infection that can be transmitted by transfusions, including HIV and hepatitis viruses.
In this context, it is important to reiterate that an adequate and safe supply of blood can only be assured through regular donations by voluntary, unpaid blood donors.
Three hundred ninety blood donors were prospectively recruited in the study from October 10, 2015, up to November 10, 2015, and convenient sampling techniques were used to recruit blood donors who were eligible to donation, consented, interviewed, and gave blood for serum screening of transfusion-transmissible infections.
This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of Hepatitis C infection in blood donors with percutaneous route and other possible etiological factors.
To learn more about donating blood and to schedule an appointment, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.
I'm also calling for the council's support to raise awareness of the potential impact of the loss of this service to blood donors and recipients of blood donation in Coventry.
Voluntary unpaid blood donors are indeed vital for ensuring a sufficient, stable blood supply.
Regular voluntary unpaid blood donors are the safest source of blood, as there are fewer blood borne infections among these donors than among people who give blood in exchange for money or who donate for family members in emergencies.
Blood collection from voluntary non-remunerated blood donors is the safest while more voluntary blood donors are needed to meet the increasing needs and to improve access to this life-saving therapy, says WHO.
The training provided updated information on the essential components of blood donor management system including infrastructure requirement for blood donor management, establishing and maintaining blood donor base, donor recruitment and retention strategies, safe blood collection techniques, blood donor counselling, referral and care, human resources management, information technology, and ethical considerations in blood donor management.