block

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Related to block level: block data

Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Data protection would run at the block level, but would also preserve file intelligence.
The system extracts video quality at the macro block level from the Elementary Stream (ES) and reports results to a PC using Ethernet networking (TCP/IP, UDP, SNMP).
However, the best implementation is not yet possible--ideally the faster hardware level should redirect the 110 requests, but only when it can handle file levels as well as block levels outside the host.
Continued consolidation in the marketplace could pave the way for a new breed of storage management applications, based on virtualization, that operate in a highly granular way at the logical (file) level (and are particularly important with regard to data archiving to meet compliance requirements), as well as at the physical block level.
This obstacle centered around IP storage appearing as block level devices on Windows networks.
In a comparison review of iSCSI Targets, the iSCSI Storage Server outperformed its competitors by offering seamless integration with Windows Storage Server 2003, providing both file and block level services, and enabling SAN-based snapshot, delta replication and zero-impact backup and restore services to application hosts attached to an IP/iSCSI network.
Direct-attached storage (DAS): DAS is still the most common storage architecture and provides the server-based block level storage that many databases require.
The iSCSI Storage Server leverages FalconStor's award winning IPStor(R) enterprise level software, and is the first fully featured, seamlessly integrated software solution designed specifically to transform Microsoft Windows Storage Server 2003 into a unified storage platform, providing both file and block level services.
The company delivers a comprehensive assertion-based verification (ABV) solution built on industry standards that provides value throughout the design and verification cycle -- from the block level to the chip and system levels.
Many companies have gone with NAS instead, but most of these devices do not handle block level storage well, lack a single point of management, and suffer from network latency issues.