Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
LCI mode is quite efficient in detecting the bleeding points during ESD, while WLE mode is recommended for the dissection procedure to avoid vascular damage.
Tips for controlling a bleeding point include percutaneous placement of a suture ligature over a roll of gauze or using a Foley catheter to tamponade the bleeder
Presence of signs of periodontal disease was high for this group of mothers showing a 63% prevalence of bleeding points, which implies the presence of an active inflammation process at the time of dental examination.
Although most cases of epistaxis can be managed by compression of the nostrils, packing of the affected nostrils, angiotonics and sedatives1, the treatment of intractable epistaxis using conventional methods remains a challenge because the bleeding points are occult and deep.
After laparotomy about 1500ml of hemoperitoneum was seen in abdominal cavity, Because of excessive bleeding point was evident.
In our study, more than 50% patients had massive hemoptysis, about 70% patients can't be identified bleeding point by chest CT, 41% patients hemorrhage source from two lungs according the bronchial arteriography.
Conclusion: Electrocautery and chemical cautery with 50% silver nitrate both are equally effective procedures to control anterior epistaxis if the bleeding point is visible and small.
Regarding control of nasal bleeding, we used 3 conservative modalities in a stepwise fashion: initially chemical cauterization (silver nitrate) if bleeding point was visible, anterior nasal packing if bleeding was profuse, and posterior nasal packing if anterior nasal packing failed.
But what if the bleeding point is too deep to reach?
Flexible esophagogastroscopy demonstrated a bleeding point.
It is lifesaving in postoperative hemorrhage after abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy where no definitive bleeding point is detectable.