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Black

Informal; describing a financial statement that ends with a positive assessment. For example, if a company produces a profit for a given period of time, it is said to be "in the black." The term comes from the color of ink used for such statements. See also: Red.

black

Of or relating to the profitability of a firm or the operations of a firm. The term derives from the color of ink used to enter a profit figure on a financial statement. Compare red.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I think about Blackness in relation to this piece, I usually am thinking about what it means to move through space and be perceived as Black and the things that come along with that perception.
Blackness, in other words, radically disorders the path of teleology.
If Blackness is a diasporic consciousness, forged and forced into existence by long histories of violence, resistance, and renegotiation, then the Wakandans, who have shielded themselves from that history in the interest of preserving their way of life, are effectively cut off from Blackness.
When there are no attempts to embody Blackness as human, writers naturally relegate it to status of non-human, or worse.
Harrison House Publishing has released the highly anticipated "Seventy Years of Blackness," the autobiography by Verda Byrd.
Music, Movement, Power: Blackness and Sonic Resistance is being presented by Radar and the Ethnic Minorities Network.
Wright sets the proverbial stage by giving readers a contextual snapshot of historical (mis)interpretations of Blackness, writing that past and present definitions/interpretations of the construct display "unnerving qualities of a mirage," appearing clear and logical from a distance--yet hazy and incoherent upon closer analysis (Wright 2015, p.
The blackness outside the front door is outside in the back garden too, for when she opens the back door, droplets of blackness begin to slither inside, infiltrate the kitchen and devour familiar objects, leaving nothing behind but blackness so dense it hurts her eyes!
Two years later, Anna again took center stage with her maternal body when she danced in blackface during Ben Jonson's The Masque of Blackness; at the time, she was six months pregnant.
It elevates a different kind of nuance in black portraiture, one that is even rarer: Sherald paints blackness that is quiet, ordinary and individual.
At the same time, and as a result of its origins and popular association with blackness, the genre is discursively linked to hegemonic racial hierarchies reified in dominant discourses of race and national identity in Puerto Rico, the United States, and throughout much of the African diaspora.
The languages of blackness have been the focus of considerable critical attention, principally in relation to Othello (1603).