Blackmail

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Blackmail

A crime in which one threatens to reveal damaging information about another unless the former is paid some amount of money or is given something of value. For example, one may threaten to reveal information about an extramarital affair or evidence that the other person committed a crime unless one is paid $100,000. Legally, blackmail is a form of extortion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Residents can report cases of cyber blackmail to Sharjah Police on 06 5943228 or by email at tech_crimes@shjpolice.
Part I advances the positive claim that blackmail affects the enforcement and content of group norms.
Finally, throughout this Article I employ the following short-hand: "B" is the person who hers acquired the information useful for blackmail, sometimes a blackmailer; "V" is the victim, usually the person to whom the information pertains; "TP" is the third party (or parties) potentially interested in the information who does not have it, often the recipient of the information should B decide to disclose it.
But the criminal prohibition on blackmail is one of the few legal rules that directly regulates a mechanism of norm enforcement.
21) Given this assumption, and if blackmail threats are deterred by criminal sanctions, we can predict what group members will typically do when they discover that another member has violated a norm: They will disclose the violation to others and, in short order, the violation will become known to the group.
Legalizing and enforcing blackmail contracts, however, will reduce the level of gossip about norm violations.
Blackmail Ambiguously Aspects the Expected Cost of Norm Violations
He explained that users of modern and advanced technology in all regions of the country can easily carry out blackmail right from within their own homes.
Al-Shulail confirmed that punishments and sanctions remain in the powers of these bodies, and that Haia has now established a department specializing in combating blackmail crimes.
Rather, the tendency for blackmail has always been present amongst both men and women.
Wafa Al-Ajami, family consultant and lecturer in the Sociology Department at Imam Mohammad ibn Saud Islamic University, commented that females were most easily used by blackmail perpetrators to do their work for them due to their tendency to be taken for granted in both public and private life.
She said that blackmail actions began to rise to the surface in society recently due to modern communication devices and mobiles with their high capabilities to take photos and visual and audio recordings.