Blackmail

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Blackmail

A crime in which one threatens to reveal damaging information about another unless the former is paid some amount of money or is given something of value. For example, one may threaten to reveal information about an extramarital affair or evidence that the other person committed a crime unless one is paid $100,000. Legally, blackmail is a form of extortion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Information also revealed that, 'the publisher angered that his plot to blackmail the bank was becoming unsuccessful, the publisher threatened to publish the false stories to rubbish the bank and its CEO.'
Captain Mohsen Ahmad, director of the electronic scams department at the Sharjah Police, explained that in cases of blackmail, the conmen initially strike a friendship with their victim through social networking sites.
Colonel Ebrahim Mussabah Al Ajel, Director of the Criminal Investigation Department at Sharjah Police, said: "We handle cases of blackmail with complete confidentiality, and urge anyone who was extorted for money to contact the police."
Residents can report cases of cyber blackmail to Sharjah Police on 06 5943228 or by email at tech_crimes@shjpolice.gov.ae.
Sarah Wright, (33), of Baker Street, Chasetown, Cannock, was sentenced at Wolverhampton Crown Court after she pleaded guilty to blackmail and demanding pounds 5,000 with menaces at an earlier hearing.
At the original court hearing at Stafford Crown Court, Graham Henson, prosecuting, said the allegations of sexual abuse were properly investigated by the police and the blackmail victim was not facing any charges.
Turki Al-Shulail, the spokesman for the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice (Haia), said the majority of blackmail incidents used to be committed against women.
Al-Shulail revealed to a local newspaper that the number of blackmail cases received by the Haia commission during the previous six months stood at 1,188 reports.
He explained that users of modern and advanced technology in all regions of the country can easily carry out blackmail right from within their own homes.
My focus is the intersection between group norms and the law of informational blackmail.(9) This intersection is important to both hypotheses.
Part I advances the positive claim that blackmail affects the enforcement and content of group norms.
Finally, throughout this Article I employ the following short-hand: "B" is the person who hers acquired the information useful for blackmail, sometimes a blackmailer; "V" is the victim, usually the person to whom the information pertains; "TP" is the third party (or parties) potentially interested in the information who does not have it, often the recipient of the information should B decide to disclose it.