blackleg

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blackleg

a worker who reports for work normally whilst the majority of his or her colleagues are on STRIKE.
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The blacklegged ticks are often found in woodland areas and they feed on the blood of mammals, birds and humans, according to multiple reports.
White-tailed deer are the primary hosts for adult blacklegged ticks, and white-footed mice and other small mammals are reservoirs of B.
Ticks can be submitted to the local public health agency to determine if it is a blacklegged tick.
The CDC analysis showed that the blacklegged tick is endemic in the northeast, upper midwest, and southern regions.
In Canada, tick surveillance, coordinated and conducted by the Nova Scotia Departments of Health and Wellness and Natural Resources and the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) of the PHAC, has identified the establishment of infected blacklegged tick populations in 6 regions in Nova Scotia, and these ticks have been found sporadically in many other locations, suggesting potential LD risk across the province.
Scientists predict that Lyme disease will continue to spread as climate change causes an increase in the humid summer conditions and mild fall weather favored by the tiny blacklegged deer tick, which is the most common transmitter of Lyme disease.
Although blacklegged deer ticks prefer mice, birds and deer, they can bite other warm-blooded mammals--including you and your dog.
The blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) spreads the disease in the Northeastern, Mid-Atlantic and NorthCentral United States, and the Western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) spreads the disease on the Pacific Coast.
Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks,''according to the CDC.
Five species of North American ticks produce the neurotoxin: the blacklegged tick (a.
Blacklegged ticks feed off the mice and pick up the bacterium that causes Lyme disease.
The blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis), vector for Lyme disease, human anaplasmosis, and human babesiosis, was found in almost every collecting locality in Harpers Ferry within Jefferson county.