birth rate


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Related to birth rate: Crude birth rate

Birth Rate

The number of babies born per 1,000 women of childbearing age in a population. This may be used to help calculate population growth. It is also called the fertility rate.

birth rate

see POPULATION.

birth rate

the number of people born into a POPULATION per thousand per year. In 2004, for example, the UK birth rate was 11 people per 1,000 of the population. The difference between this rate and the DEATH RATE is used to calculate the rate of growth of the population of a country over time. The birth rate tends to decline as a country attains higher levels of economic development. See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experts Shorto talked to ascribed low birth rates partly to traditional family patterns that penalize women who try to raise a family and hold a job at the same time.
A report by Charles Westoff of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University shows that the birth rate actually increased slightly between the surveys of 1998 and 2003, from 4.7 to 4.8.
This rise in the female labor participation rate helps explain both the fall in the marriage and birth rates.
* Birth rates for women aged 30-34 years increased by 4% from 2002 to 2003, while the rate for women aged 35-39 years rose 6%
Italy has one of the world's lowest birth rates - 9.3 births per 1,000 inhabitants - and one of the oldest populations.
Over the past 30 years, however, our regional birth rate dropped well below the replacement rate of 2.1 children per couple, while the rate for Canada ranges just above 1.0.
* In 2000, the birth rate for females 18 to 19 years of age declined 1 percent to 79.2 per 1,000.
The leading thinkers on this subject, from French demographer Jean-Claude Chesnais to American MacArthur genius and feminist economist Nancy Folbre, have made a provocative case that when women have wide opportunities in the workplace that are severely curtailed by having children, the birth rate will fall to very low levels.
If the birth rate in developing nations goes to European levels - around 1.7 per woman - in the distant future, then the total would become about 4 billion in developing countries.
These data support the hypothesis of an inverse relationship between birth rates and GDP per capita.
These data are consistent with the small increase in the birth rate shown in chart 8.
Another set of contradictions emerges from Tarrant's claim that 'the nation with the closest political and social values to my own is the People's Republic of China.' His assertion is odd given the Australian terrorist's obsession with high birth rates for China undertook humanity's most significant effort to reduce its birth rate and promote sustainable population management deliberately.