Bipartisan

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Bipartisan

Describing any measure or policy that draws support from two political parties. For example, in the United States, a unanimously passed defense bill may be said to be bipartisan. The term is used in countries with de facto or de jure two-party systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
A corollary, don't forget that it was unwittingly my big brother who poisoned the chalice of the cordial Bipartisanship and by extension Saraki's chalice.
Like McCain, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer held out the possibility of bipartisanship. In a statement, he urged Republicans to "start from scratch and work with Democrats on a bill that lowers premiums, provides long-term stability to the markets and improves our health care system."
Cast your vote on this discussion on medical bipartisanship whichever degree or office you hold.
Politics aside, MDMA participants were excited about the bipartisanship displayed in the face of issues so important to them.
"Her integrity, bipartisanship and tireless dedication to improving the plight of small business will be sorely missed."
Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said: "You want bipartisanship? You're going to get it on this issue....
Fast-forward to December 2009, and that heady early fog of bipartisanship that once enveloped the Good Ship Gregg has disappeared, and he now clearly is back in the fold.
Obama urged Democrats and Republicans to work in a spirit of bipartisanship to formulate a healthcare reform plan for the benefit of all Americans.
Thomas and Beckel, noted political analysts who possess contrary political leanings, offer this guide to bipartisanship and explain how the use of consensus politics is the only way for the United States to complete a healing process.
But with only 38% of Americans saying the Republicans in Congress are making a sincere effort to work with Obama and the Democrats, compared with 66% who say Obama is trying to work with the Republicans, Americans seem more likely to fault the Republicans than the president for the lack of tangible evidence of increased bipartisanship. (At the same time, only 44% say the Democrats in Congress are making a sincere effort to work with Republicans, suggesting that while Obama gets solid credit for efforts at bipartisanship, his fellow party members in Congress do not.)
With a reputation for bipartisanship during her 12 years in the Senate, Collins helped convene a group of about 20 senators from both major parties who sought to boost investment in job-creating infrastructure projects while scrubbing the legislation of expenditures that, while worthwhile, would not contribute to turning the economy around.
LONDON: Bipartisanship seems to have taken a drubbing in Washington since President Barack Obama got to the White House.