Biotechnology

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Related to biotechnologists: biotechnical, biotech engineering

Biotechnology

The use of living things, such as one-cell organisms, in technological innovations. Biotechnology has particular applications in medicine, agriculture, engineering, and similar fields. Biotech organizations may make and market their own products, or they may be departments within another company, such as a pharmaceutical corporation.
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Mice that received normal animal feed with a five-per-cent fat content did not lose any weight or reduce their intake of food, says the biotechnologist.
Mario Molina (USA) who were able to present their revolutionary investigations delving deep into drug discovery and therapy findings to an enthralled audience of eminent scientists, researchers, pharmacists, academicians and biotechnologists.
For the biotechnologist looking for insight into what he or she may face in the future, many of the chapters in Somsen's work can provide the answers.
For example, biotechnologists are working to replace current chemicals with new bioinsecticides that will destroy pests by exposing them to fungal infections.
Roger Avakian, chief technology officer at PolyOne in Avon Lakes, Ohio, imagines producing customized polymers to order in a manner similar to the way biotechnologists combine amino acids in a programmed sequence to self-assemble into specific polypeptides.
When biotechnologists with an economic stake in these technologies make exaggerated health claims, progressives must question their claims as much as we question those of plant and animal genetic engineers.
Biotechnologists seeking to engineer the cells to produce certain types of new cells found their efforts hindered by genes that appeared to be controlling the whole network's operation.
Such widespread contamination risks creating totally unintended combinations of engineered traits--and biotechnologists are now field-testing, or seeking to test, hundreds of varieties genetically tweaked to produce drugs, vaccines, plastics, industrial chemicals, and even human proteins (see "Silent Winter," May/June World Watch).
Biotechnologists envision a future in which high-tech gadgets using a single drop of blood can determine a person's risk for all known genetic diseases.
Ever since embryonic stem cells were first extracted from human embryos in 1998, biotechnologists, abetted by a compliant media, have promised they would soon lead to miraculous medical cures for degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.
I do not presume to provide final answers, but rather support attempts to start an ongoing dialogue between scientists, biotechnologists, bioethicists and healthcare professionals.
Imagine a world in the not-so-distant future where biotechnologists and/or genetic engineers create human clones to perform menial labor.

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