Biotechnology

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Biotechnology

The use of living things, such as one-cell organisms, in technological innovations. Biotechnology has particular applications in medicine, agriculture, engineering, and similar fields. Biotech organizations may make and market their own products, or they may be departments within another company, such as a pharmaceutical corporation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despues 24 meses el biosensor de glucosa desarrollado aun conserva el 85% de su sensibilidad inicial; es decir, durante ese tiempo su sensibilidad ha disminuido solo en un 15%.
Biosensor Applications, headquartered in Solna, Sweden, develops, manufactures and sells biotechnology-based vapour and trace detection systems.
Prices are set at 3,150,000 yen ($28,300) for the biosensor and 21,000 yen ($190) for 10 diagnosis filters (2 of each type).
Other biosensor technologies are overcoming these shortfalls and are now beginning to have an impact on the biosensor market.
One drawback to current silicon biosensors is that they are made on a backing that's too rigid to curve around wounds.
Gray says there are two elements in the biosensor process: the detector (the biologically active agent), and the transducer that converts the response into something measurable.
leader of the Biosensor Technologies Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory.
The dynamic method of measurement based on the determination of the maximum rate of current change during the experiment allows the researchers to carry out faster measurements in a wider substrate concentration range compared to steady-state output of a biosensor.
Covalent attachment of the mecA capture probe (5'-GTCATTTCTACTTCACCATTACCAAC-3') was accomplished by reacting the homobifunctional cross-linker disuccidimidyl suberate (Pierce) with the 3' amine of the capture probe and amines on the biosensor surface, producing a stable amide linkage.
Biosensor research began more than 30 years ago with the report by Clark and Lyons in 1962 of the enzyme electrode.
The most significant advantage of the biosensor is the time saved in assessing the presence of contamination.
The biosensor can simultaneously detect 12 pathogens including Salmonella, E.