Biowarfare

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Related to biological warfare: Chemical and Biological Warfare

Biowarfare

The open use by a nation state of germs and other living beings to kill, injure or incapacitate its enemy. There are numerous examples of biowarfare dating back thousands of years. The Biological Weapons Convention was intended to stop biowarfare, but some analysts believe nation states have further developed their capacity to conduct war in this way. See also: Bioterrorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of these agents such as brucellosis glanders and ricin were either weaponized by statesponsored programmes in the past or utilized successfully in biological warfare or terrorist incidents
Identify and describe the most important agents that have been developed or used in biological warfare.
The device can simultaneously identify up to 10 different biological warfare agents in a given sample, including smallpox, anthrax, plague, and encephalitis.
Ricin has long featured in the history of biological warfare.
The US government was funding scientists to research biological warfare technology and it was going out all over the country, indeed, around the world.
In view of this increasing polarization and the reliance of the United States on military power as the basis of security, it is vital to reassess Western policies on biological warfare in context: the legacy of the vast biological weapons program pursued by the Soviet Union; the Middle East as a crucible of conflict over which looms weapons of mass destruction; the dramatic expansion of U.
Latifiyah: Biological warfare facility designed for handling botulinum toxin
Although it became a signatory to the BWC in 1972 and became a State Party in 1991, Iraq has developed, produced, and stockpiled biological warfare agents and weapons.
America's citizens can be sure that their government agencies--local, state, and federal--are ready to respond to biological warfare and bioterrorism quickly and effectively throughout the country.
The prevention of biological warfare through the strengthening of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) is one of the department's main research projects.
Hank Ellison's Emergency Action for Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents tells police, paramedics, firefighters, and other emergency responders just what actions to take in a crisis involving hazardous materials.
Qiu Mingxuan, a Chinese quarantine official, claimed that residents of east China's Zhejiang Province are still suffering from the effects of Japan's World War II biological warfare.