Biowarfare

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Related to bio-warfare: Bioweapons

Biowarfare

The open use by a nation state of germs and other living beings to kill, injure or incapacitate its enemy. There are numerous examples of biowarfare dating back thousands of years. The Biological Weapons Convention was intended to stop biowarfare, but some analysts believe nation states have further developed their capacity to conduct war in this way. See also: Bioterrorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the introduction of nuclear arms and the potential for bio-warfare, the level of fire-power has taken a qualitative leap, making comparisons with previous wars or military stalemates no longer applicable.
The idea is to continually test the horses and other animals on the property for signs of bio-contamination, train emergency responders and treat infected animals after a bio-warfare attack or biological emergency.
ALERT: Mr Norris's home, Black Lodge' PORTON DOWN: Staff from bio-warfare centre will tackle infection site
1 candidate," Shoham continued, "because of its long, common border with Iraq, because a number of Iraqi bio-warfare scientists fled to Syria before the war, and because Syrian President Bashar Assad had a much closer relationship with Saddam than his late father, Hafez.
The company, which makes products that detect biological weapons, is likely to announce record sales from its bio-warfare arm as fears about terrorism remain high.
If [the researcher] worked in a Chinese, Russian, or Iranian laboratory," he says, "his work might well be seen as the 'smoking gun' of a bio-warfare program.
But school security experts and administrators across the country agree that as the demands of school security increase by the week, with fears of terrorism, bio-warfare and other attacks, technology is only one of the three main ingredients needed to create the safest schools possible.
While no sane American relishes the thought of an Iraqi regime armed with nuclear or bio-warfare weapons, the question patriotic Americans must confront is this: Are we willing to send our nation's sons to kill and die on behalf of UN disarmament decrees, which would eventually apply to our own country as well?
Weaponized spores are so small, "10,000 of them are like a speck of dust," says bio-warfare expert Jonathan Tucker at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Washington, D.
The Sunday Express reported in April that a routine audit in the UK Government's bio-warfare research laboratory at Porton Down, Wiltshire, revealed that a container of foot and mouth virus was missing two months before the first official outbreak.
Dr Aileen Marty delivered a lecture on the future of bio-warfare and bio-terrorism to students and staff at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.
A dilemma is how to study the threats of bio-warfare in detail and develop vaccines and other countermeasures, while maintaining the policy of abhorrence at the idea of using disease as a weapon.