Binding

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Related to bindingness: conferred, reconfirm, pay heed, vitiation

Binding

1. In printing, the process that collates and attaches pages to each other to create the finished book or periodical. Binding is also called the bindery line.

2. See: Binding a Tariff.

3. For insurance, see: Binding receipt.
References in periodicals archive ?
95) The immediate bindingness of the moral law can serve as the unquestionable foundation for a transcendental justification of a priori moral concepts because Kant holds that, on some level, everyone acknowledges moral obligation.
Beginning in the early 1990s, agencies have included boilerplate disclaimers of both the external enforceability and bindingness of their guidance documents.
Column (2) shows that the results also hold if we use the fill rate as a measure of quota bindingness.
certain facts whose bindingness, by hypothesis, requires the existence
Nor would States likely find acceptable a disarmament arrangement that is based on toasts, press releases, or mere political commitments that could change at a moment's notice, hence the standard of legal bindingness.
So, Joyce cannot mean that moral reasons are tied up with reactive attitudes and fault when he claims that moral reasons have a practical "oomph" or authoritative bindingness.
16) Nevertheless, one wonders how far such an argument would go toward convincing a hypothetical group of committed textualists and state sovereigntists that not only are the judges in the states "bound" by the supreme law of the land, this bindingness must be given institutional force through the Supreme Court's oversight of state courts where federal issues are concerned.
Finally, reliable behavioral success requires low malignancy, high determinacy and bindingness of regime rules, and strong systems for fisher-report verification.
Traditionally, positivism's focus on bindingness had meant that "law" was to be strictly equated with the law in force within a given jurisdiction.
The institution of punishment gives genuine bindingness to the rule of law by providing significant incentives not to violate legal rules.
An allocation in accordance with the OOCS-value does not depend on the bindingness of the agreement as it is a strong equilibrium and hence a CPNE.