Binding

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Binding

1. In printing, the process that collates and attaches pages to each other to create the finished book or periodical. Binding is also called the bindery line.

2. See: Binding a Tariff.

3. For insurance, see: Binding receipt.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Accurin that has been selected, both companies will work together on preclinical research; Pfizer will have responsibility for development and commercialisation, and BIND will conduct chemistry, manufacturing and control activitie.
As in Anslyn's experiments, the test chemicals bind to the receptors, displacing the indicator molecules and causing the dyes to change color.
The ability of Norwalk virus to bind to oysters tissues at the same binding site as that used to bind to human tissues suggests a possible coevolution mechanism involving the oyster as an intermediary vector.
One limitation of the two bind systems discussed so far is that they require vinyl covers.
In April 2002, Blueprint set out to enter 80,000 interactions into BIND with Genome Canada's CDN $12.5 million investment over three years.
Meanwhile, if you continue to crank, loose cable winds off the winch drum, gets tangled and binds. At this point it's best not to unlock the cam locks, because the wing will drop until the safety strap or cable stops it.
The Internet Software Consortium (ISC), Redwood City, Calif., has announced initial members of the ISC BIND (Berkeley Internet Name Domain) Forum, a new program for vendors and users of ISC BIND software.
Feet may be unbound, but one can still bind hands, bind eyes, bind ears, bind heads, and bind tongues." Lu Xun, the leading modern Chinese writer, conceived of Chinese history as a cannibalistic discourse.
Nanomedicine company BIND Therapeutics (BIND) reported on Friday an amendment to its existing credit facility with Hercules Technology III, L.P., an affiliate of Hercules Technology Growth Capital (NYSE:HTCG).
Kane's team studded the surface of each liposome with peptides that can attach to the sites on the PA protein that bind to a cell.
Activated IRF3, together with NF-[kappa][beta] and AP-1, accumulate in the nucleus, bind to the IFN[beta] promoter, and stimulate transcription.
Twice in Matthew's Gospel the words "bind" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and "loose" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] occur in what is apparently a formula that the readers are expected to recognize: