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Bit

The smallest unit of information a computer can hold in its memory. A bit is always represented as a 0 or a 1 in binary code. The word is a contraction of "binary digit."

bit

a digit which takes the value zero or one and which can therefore be represented electronically by an off/on switch in a COMPUTER. Computers use groups of bits to represent numbers or letters for storage, transmission and processing of numerical or alphabetical data. Specifically, computers use various off/on permutations of eight bits to represent all numbers, letters and punctuation characters. Most computers use multiples of eight bits to handle data in this way and various eight-bit, sixteen-bit and thirty-two bit machines are available, the larger ones generally being able to process data faster.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among them, the variables restored in N_ INPUT[i][j] are MSD binary digits, while the variables restored in D_INPUT[i] [j] are conventional binary digits.
The result is the hardware capacity in bytes, and therefore presented in the same unit of measurement as storage and communication when measured in binary digits.
In parallel, a unique, longtime effort by the Minnesota Internet Traffic Studies project (Odlyzko, 2009) has assessed the global flow of data through the Internet backbone measured in bandwidth of binary digits.
The second person was also attached to an EEG amplifier and their PC would pick up the stream of binary digits and flash an LED lamp at two different frequencies, one for zero and the other one for one.
In the article, Mercer starts with the basics, explaining the binary digits, or bits, that are at the heart of computer data, and then explains why the hexadecimal system is needed to represent 26 letters and 10 numbers.
In other words, we need 7,372,800 binary digits for each frame of video.
The key length is expressed as the number of binary digits required to store the key.
The UUEncode software converts the item to binary digits and re-converts it at the other end.
Digital TV converts material into binary digits, which can be crammed together to allow far more channels into a smaller space.
Each string of binary digits, or bits, tells the beam at the back of your TV how bright to make each dot.