Bill of Rights

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Bill of Rights

A generic term referring to a (usually concise) list of rights that citizens of a state possess. For example, a bill of rights may include the freedom to practice religion and the freedom to vote for the candidate of one's choice. There are two types of bill of rights. An entrenched bill of rights may not be amended without a complicated process, such as a popular referendum. An unentrenched bill of rights, on the other hand, may be amended or changed by normal legislative procedure. See also: Constitution.
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The federal and Alberta Bills of Rights continue in force alongside the Charter.
Obviously, bills of rights can be useful in situations in which statutory provisions are already violating the basic rights of people.
Patients' bills of rights are piously described as serving patients.
State bills of rights functioned as declaratory provisions as much as, if not more than, they served as positive-law provisions.