bill

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Bill

1. A statement given buy a seller to a buyer itemizing the sale and demanding payment. A bill may be for the sale of a good or a service. The bill usually states the names of the counterparties, the goods and/or services purchased, and adds any applicable sales tax or VAT. It may also include the terms of sale, especially if it is a credit sale. A bill is also called an invoice. See also: Receipt.

2. Informal for Treasury bill.

bill

1. A Treasury bill.
2. See due bill.

bill

  1. 1a financial instrument, such as a BILL OF EXCHANGE and TREASURY BILL, that is issued by a firm or government as a means of borrowing money.
  2. the colloquial term used to describe an INVOICE (a request for payment for products or services received).
  3. a draft of a particular piece of legislation that forms the basis of an Act of Parliament, such as the Fair Trading Act 1973.
References in classic literature ?
Freddie Drummond had had an inkling of what was coming, and had sent Bill Totts to join the union and investigate.
During the rest of that short and successful strike, Bill constituted himself Mary Condon's henchman and messenger, and when it was over returned to the University to be Freddie Drummond and to wonder what Bill Totts could see in such a woman.
Freddie Drummond was entirely safe, but Bill had fallen in love.
That's you, Bill," returned Black Dog, "you're in the right of it, Billy.
He would have told Bill to quit playing it--more than once the sharp words were on his tongue--but memories of the enthusiasm he had evinced the night he brought it home kept him silent.
The clock ticked off the seconds he was stealing from his father; counted the minutes that had never belonged to Bill before, but which now tasted like old wine on the palate.
There was an angry altercation, and the owner of the bar stepped forward and ordered Tough Bill to go.
I guess you'd better get out of Marseilles before Tough Bill comes out of hospital," he said to Strickland, when they had got back to the Chink's Head and were cleaning themselves.
But he found himself encompassed with guards and forced to remain silent while the Chief Circle in a few impassioned words made a final appeal to the Women, exclaiming that, if the Colour Bill passed, no marriage would henceforth be safe, no woman's honour secure; fraud, deception, hypocrisy would pervade every household; domestic bliss would share the fate of the Constitution and pass to speedy perdition.
So great is the terror with which even now our Aristocracy looks back to the far-distant days of the agitation for the Universal Colour Bill.
Once their uproar became so loud that Bill woke up.
Daylight was yet three hours away, though it was already six o'clock; and in the darkness Henry went about preparing breakfast, while Bill rolled the blankets and made the sled ready for lashing.