bill

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Bill

1. A statement given buy a seller to a buyer itemizing the sale and demanding payment. A bill may be for the sale of a good or a service. The bill usually states the names of the counterparties, the goods and/or services purchased, and adds any applicable sales tax or VAT. It may also include the terms of sale, especially if it is a credit sale. A bill is also called an invoice. See also: Receipt.

2. Informal for Treasury bill.

bill

1. A Treasury bill.
2. See due bill.

bill

  1. 1a financial instrument, such as a BILL OF EXCHANGE and TREASURY BILL, that is issued by a firm or government as a means of borrowing money.
  2. the colloquial term used to describe an INVOICE (a request for payment for products or services received).
  3. a draft of a particular piece of legislation that forms the basis of an Act of Parliament, such as the Fair Trading Act 1973.
References in classic literature ?
"Hold on, now, that's too much!" Bill dropped the trunk to the floor with a bang, straightened up, and thrust his hand into his inside coat pocket.
Freddie Drummond had had an inkling of what was coming, and had sent Bill Totts to join the union and investigate.
"Bill," said the stranger in a voice that I thought he had tried to make bold and big.
"Come, Bill, you know me; you know an old shipmate, Bill, surely," said the stranger.
The poor little Lizard, Bill, was in the middle, being held up by two guinea-pigs, who were giving it something out of a bottle.
He would have told Bill to quit playing it--more than once the sharp words were on his tongue--but memories of the enthusiasm he had evinced the night he brought it home kept him silent.
The clock ticked off the seconds he was stealing from his father; counted the minutes that had never belonged to Bill before, but which now tasted like old wine on the palate.
Now, Tough Bill was not the man to put up with humiliation at the hands of a common sailor.
In a little while Tough Bill, accompanied by two huge negroes, came in, and it was easy to see that he was already three parts drunk.
Gradually introducing the mention of the dangers to the Tradesmen, the Professional Classes and the Gentlemen, he silenced the rising murmurs of the Isosceles by reminding them that, in spite of all these defects, he was willing to accept the Bill if it was approved by the majority.
Bill opened his mouth to speak, but changed his mind.
Now, my dear, about that crib at Chertsey; when is it to be done, Bill, eh?