bill

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Bill

1. A statement given buy a seller to a buyer itemizing the sale and demanding payment. A bill may be for the sale of a good or a service. The bill usually states the names of the counterparties, the goods and/or services purchased, and adds any applicable sales tax or VAT. It may also include the terms of sale, especially if it is a credit sale. A bill is also called an invoice. See also: Receipt.

2. Informal for Treasury bill.

bill

1. A Treasury bill.
2. See due bill.

bill

  1. 1a financial instrument, such as a BILL OF EXCHANGE and TREASURY BILL, that is issued by a firm or government as a means of borrowing money.
  2. the colloquial term used to describe an INVOICE (a request for payment for products or services received).
  3. a draft of a particular piece of legislation that forms the basis of an Act of Parliament, such as the Fair Trading Act 1973.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keep your purse, billfold, and valuables where others cannot reach them.
It's not every day that someone in Arkansas digs into his billfold to spend an estimated $18 million to build a golf course that few people will ever see, let alone play.
The problem with eight-character passwords is that people have trouble memorizing them, so they write their password down on a slip of paper and tape the paper to their laptop or slip it into their billfold.
It may not be particularly generous on my part, but on those rare occasions when pro-abortionists seem to be conceding, in a backhanded sort of way, a tiny error, I instinctively reach for my billfold.
But he soon finds a pearl worth all the platinum in his Gucci billfold.
Chuck Hagel (R-Neb) "that he was separated from his group, his billfold, passport, and briefcase taken out of sight, his shoes removed, and he was ordered to stand on one foot.
The man had a set of master keys and 20,000 yen he had apparently taken from a billfold containing 100,000 yen.
He then pulls out his billfold and peels off six $100 bills, placing them in the man's hand.
No bad thing given that the wallet is still in intensive care from its Christmas mugging, only to come under fresh threat from the usual suspects who labour under the illusion that the poor old battered billfold is well enough to be carried off in triumph to the sales.
It contains a billfold for cash, four slots for credit cards and two inside pockets for business cards.