bid

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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
It bids fair fully to restore Ferreira to his rightful place among the major literary figures of sixteenth-century Portuguese literature.
Kevin Mongrain's monograph constitutes not only the opening salvo in what bids fair to become the "interpretation wars" over Balthasar's thought, but might well set the standard for all future interpretations of Balthasar.
He bids fair to win the title of Prosperity Chancellor.
This coup not only boosts his own professional career and gives his employer political clout but, we may presume, also bids fair to engender a first-rate scandal on the German political scene.
Yet the times are changing and Fibre Channel bids fair to become only an enabler for SANs.
This latest distinction bids fair to enhance Vigan's budding reputation as a global tourist destination, as well as to serve as an economic boost to the Ilocos region, and to promote local destinations, goods and services.
The emirate bids fair to assume the role of a real estate hot spot with developers sensing there is immense potential for catering to top-drawer housing and leisure markets.
In 1891 a visitor to Whitmore Bay would write that: ``Already the sands are studded with bathing machines, and Barry bids fair to be a favourite seaside resort.