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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many agencies, this may be the time to contemplate online forward auctions--the more familiar type where buyers bid for excess property, materials, or equipment.
ollowed by a space and then your bid amount in cent and send it to 57582.
Notices of the BID are typically sent to businesses in highly technical, arcane language.
Note also that before the last seconds of the auction, some bidders did want to revise their bids after being outbid by other bidders.
A guy was speeding on the GW Parkway to get a large bid to the CIA.
7 Essentially, in such an auction, bidders condition their behavior on the highest expected value of the security and shade their bids the least relative to the other formats.
Biederman was pleased to hear that BIDs will be given greater flexibility in their efforts to raise money, and though his 34th Street Partnership is well-funded now, he is glad that three years from now the BID can revisit long-term debt financing.
Everyone whose firm has no official bid checklist can send me $10.
Turning back to the February auction, it is fair to ask whether a more rigorous investigation into the authenticity of bids at that time might have made a difference in regard to subsequent events.
regulators to ensure that BIDS fulfills all regulatory requirements.
We should encourage the creation of Business Improvement Districts in areas that are not experiencing economic resurgence, because BIDs have been successful across the city," wrote Michael Bloomberg shortly after Sept.
This means that GSA finds it easy to conduct tained bids to please the client.