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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, we see that bidders are not using the eBay proxy bidding agent as eBay advises, to bid once early in the auction.
of Pasadena, whose subsidiary Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group is part of one of the remaining teams bidding on Belmont, said he agreed with the district's assessment of Belmont's complexity.
The strategic purchaser could corner the issue by bidding substantially more than the market consensus but pay a price closer to the mass of the distribution that marks the other bids.
This bidding can take the form of a live auction with bidders calling out prices, or it can be a longer-term eBay style "static" auction, or it can be a sealed bid auction.
In the state of New York, a deficiency may be secured against the mortgagor to the extent that the bidding price was less than the reasonable market value of the property.
Returns at IAA have continued to increase due largely to IAA's expanded service offerings, increased buyer base and dual bidding strategy in which live auctions are supplemented with a live auction Internet bidding capability.
Critics were outraged that the district chose to defy early warnings and spent so much money without a competitive bidding processes.
Unlike simple rules-based bidding systems, SearchForce's algorithmic-based bidding approach compares keywords individually or as a group with the specific goal of improving the performance of return-driven objectives.
Competitive bidding guarantees an open process and gets the best price.
The online system quickly identifies subcontractors, vendors or suppliers interested in bidding on their construction jobs.
The auctioneer will submit bids on your behalf, never bidding more than necessary to secure the lot and never more than the amount you specify.
This technology is used to power IAA's online bidding product, I-bid LIVE(SM), which allows buyers to join live auctions through any Internet-enabled computer and bid along with both live local bidders and other Internet bidders.