bid

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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Planning for the future Both bidders and procuring authorities will need to establish very quickly how they are going to manage these new rules.
The results for both products are quite clear: "inexperienced" bidders bid just as highly in the auctions of sellers with no transaction history as they do when the seller has a history of hundreds or even thousands of properly conducted transactions.
Impermissible contacts with the governmental entity occurs when the bidder contacts an individual at a state agency who is not the "designated contact person" for the particular procurement in an attempt to influence that agency.
To understand the bidding behavior that the proxy bidding system elicits, it will help to first consider how different the auction would be if instead of informing all bidders about the bid history at each point of time during the auction, the auction were a second-price sealed-bid auction (in which nobody is informed about the proxy bids of other bidders until the auction is over).
On Wednesday, he disqualified one of the three bidders, The Eastridge Companies, following a finding by district Inspector General Don Mullinax that the firm appeared to have had a conflict of interest in violation of its contract.
The final step in the auction is for bidders to submit sealed bids for the purchase of the company.
This is the "winner's curse" and gives aggressive bidders an additional reason to rein in their enthusiasm.
Bidders will know exactly how much they are bidding with every bid.
But the building's rising cost, driven up by feverish late-round competition, may not be the only thing that will thin the herd of bidders and help wrap the sale up.
I never thought there'd be a zillion bidders,'' Young said.
The first phase, which has been developed by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, encompasses a system that provides for the electronic submission of bids placed throughout the country, mainly by noncompetitive bidders, using the Federal Reserve's standard "Fedline" terminal.
Online Auction Provider Brings 750 Auctions to Global Bidders