bid


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Bid

The price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Sometimes also used in the context of takeovers where one corporation is bidding for (trying to buy) another corporation. In trading, we have the bid-ask spread which is the difference between what buyers are willing to pay and what sellers are asking for in terms of price.

Bid

1. An offer by an investor to buy a security.

2. The highest price a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. See also: Ask, Bid-ask spread.

bid

1. The price that a potential buyer is willing to pay for a security. Compare ask. See also best bid.
2. An offer to purchase something.

Bid.

The bid is the price a market maker or broker is willing to pay for a security, such as a stock or bond, at a particular time. In the real estate market, a bid is the amount a buyer offers to pay for a property.

bid

  1. an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium which the predator must pay for control of the company. However, on occasions, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company, or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an offer to purchase an item (for example, a house or antique vase) which has been put up for sale at a specified price or is to be sold subject to receipt of ‘other prices’. The latter may occur at an AUCTION where a number of would-be buyers each put in a bid for an item, the final sale going to the highest bidder unless a predetermined ‘reserve’ has been set but not reached.

bid

  1. 1an offer by one company to purchase all or the majority of the SHARES of another company as a means of effecting a TAKEOVER. The bid price offered by the predator for the voting shares in the victim company must generally exceed the current market price of those shares, the difference being a premium that the predator must pay for control of the company On occasions, however, the market price of the shares may subsequently rise to exceed the initial bid price where investors either feel that the bid price undervalues the company or where investors anticipate, for example, the possibility of a second party making a higher bid. The offer price could be paid solely in cash, or in a mix of cash and shares in the acquirer's own company, or solely in terms of the acquirer's shares (called a paper bid). In order to finance a takeover bid, a predator company may raise loans. See TAKEOVER BID (leveraged bid).
  2. an indication of willingness to purchase an item that is for sale at the prevailing selling price. This may occur at auction when many purchasers bid for items on sale, the final sale going to the purchaser offering the highest price unless a predetermined reserve price has been set that was not reached. See AUCTION.

bid

(1) An offer to purchase at a specific price, usually at an auction or foreclosure.(2) An offer to complete specified work for a certain price,usually presented in the context of a request for sealed bids to complete government work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Timing is favorable for US Airways' bid for Delta: US Airways should move quickly to merge with Delta Air Lines, the Arizona Republic's John Talton writes.
A reverse auction was held with bidders able to see competing bids in real time.
The lowest unique bid at 8pm on Tuesday October 18 2005 gets the lot.
BIDS are essentially perpetual since it is rarely worthwhile for any individual business to expend the energy to oppose bureaucratic entrenchment.
Because the time it takes to place a bid can vary considerably because of, for example, internet congestion or connection times, last-minute bids have a positive probability of being lost.
Late bids are the subject of a thousand stories some beyond belief.
A second-price auction, in which the winner pays, not his or her bid, but only the second-best bid, severs the gain in winning from the probability of winning.
US Airways' bid to acquire bankrupt Delta Air Lines raises questions about the future of the regional airlines that have service agreements with the mainline carriers and compete on a number of routes.
Walsh was formerly head of the 14th Street BID, which has the distinction of being the first BID formed in New York City.
a leading supplier of Web-based collaboration solutions for the construction industry, has introduced Precision X-DOC(TM), an enhancement to its PrimeSite(TM) project management system that enables online bid management with electronic data transfer into Timberline Estimating.
That is if the incumbent at FAA is earning $67,000 a year I might bid, if qualified, $61,000 and take his job away.
It is clear that House of Blues had the winning bid.