Bias

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Bias

1. In statistics, a circumstance leading to inaccurate results because of conscious or unconscious manipulation of data. Bias is anything that reduces the randomness of the sample being tested.

2. Anything that affects a decision other than facts. For example, a company may be disinclined to expand into an area of town because it is perceived as dangerous, whether or not it actually is. Bias is thought to reduce efficiency. See also: Behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
To create a culture of inclusiveness, we all must look at and acknowledge our biases, so we can do something about the ones that are unfair or cause harm to others like racial bias.
Algorithms can have built-in biases because they are created by individuals who have conscious or unconscious preferences that may go undiscovered until the algorithms are used, and potentially amplified, publicly.
Review data sets as well as the underlying algorithms used in analytics to ensure that hidden biases aren't having an unintended impact on certain stakeholder groups.
To make sure these results were specific to racial biases, the researchers performed the same analysis using sexuality bias, which Project Implicit also collects.
As lawyers, self-reflecting on implicit biases is particularly important.
Bias-based bullying and multiple bias-based bullying have different effects on students, and interventions are needed to focus on those underlying biases," added Hope.
(27) Unintentional or insensitive attitudes and behaviours towards out-group members often reflects innate prejudices or biases. (28,29) Race, gender and age are the three most common categories used for stereotyping, prejudice and discrimination.
Understanding biases within groups is a core anthropological pursuit.
Much of the earliest research assumed that employers' biases did not directly affect output.
These biases affect the care we administer in the subtlest ways that ultimately negatively impact patient outcomes.
The process is complicated and made less effective than might be because of a variety of cognitive biases that impair logical thinking and analysis and lead to errors of judgment, misevaluations, and bad choices.
Being aware of one's biases could mean a significant increase in retirement savings, according to a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research.