Bias

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Bias

1. In statistics, a circumstance leading to inaccurate results because of conscious or unconscious manipulation of data. Bias is anything that reduces the randomness of the sample being tested.

2. Anything that affects a decision other than facts. For example, a company may be disinclined to expand into an area of town because it is perceived as dangerous, whether or not it actually is. Bias is thought to reduce efficiency. See also: Behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
This phenomenon could also amplify other biases in data, for example, issues around race.
Differences in who we are can result in our bringing unconscious biases into interactions with people different from ourselves, which can result in misunderstanding or conflict.
The IAT is a social psychology test designed to measure an individual's unconscious biases toward different demographic groups.
The study looks at two common biases that can affect how one saves for retirement -- present bias, the tendency to put more value in current or short-term decisions than the future, and exponential-growth bias, aka the tendency to underestimate and neglect the power of compounding investment returns.
To estimate the prevalence of these two biases, the authors use data from two online surveys, the RAND American Life Panel and the Understanding America Study.
In this light, the author points to research that suggests that reporters' partisan biases are secondary to their professional orientation.
5 percent resulted from biases against disabilities.
Abreu (2001) reviewed the theory and research surrounding stereotypes and prejudice and included evidence that such biases can occur outside conscious awareness.
T Gilovich, D Griffin and D Kahneman (eds), The Psychology of Intuitive Judgment: Heuristics and Biases.
It behoves us all to ensure our biases do not take us too far from the straight and narrow.
The architect must see these biases and seek the whole picture process and then pick the right level of abstraction.
Researchers study implicit biases using any of several techniques, such as tracking participants' feelings and behaviors after subliminally showing them pictures of black or old people.