Bias

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Bias

1. In statistics, a circumstance leading to inaccurate results because of conscious or unconscious manipulation of data. Bias is anything that reduces the randomness of the sample being tested.

2. Anything that affects a decision other than facts. For example, a company may be disinclined to expand into an area of town because it is perceived as dangerous, whether or not it actually is. Bias is thought to reduce efficiency. See also: Behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
For more than 20 years, researchers have identified a phenomenon called "hostile media perception", which means readers and viewers are inclined to think that journalists are biased against their particular point of view.
Am I biased because of how I feel about the patient, what happened to me yesterday, or what happened in a similar case 10 years ago after which I felt badly or was sanctioned?
Because the student has pre-existing knowledge about the instructor, faculty evaluations may be biased compared with students who have not had the professor previously.
Then again, he added, most of the facts coming out of Iraq are biased against the Bush administration.
Innis argues that the cultural predominance of spatially biased media of communications, such as television and cinema, contribute to the creation of "monopolies of knowledge" (what American Walter Lippmann later termed "the manufacture of consent") that spread themselves over vast geographical distances and can elide differences, encourage stereotypes and presume to occupy a pre-eminent, centralized, perhaps even "aerial" view.
Because the response rates were less than 70% in some sectors or overall, an analysis was conducted to determine if CATI estimates were significantly biased due to CATI nonresponse.
1/2] The large noise was caused by the generation-recombination (G-R) noise of the biased PC HgCdTe detector.
There's a tendency for many of us to discount what we hear on the basis that the callers themselves are openly biased," he said.
To explain the importance of being biased, Lawrence analyzes bias-crime laws within the context of traditional moral theories and orthodox First Amendment concerns.
According to Scheuer, television is the perfect vehicle for conservatism because television's visual and rhetorical conventions are biased toward a quick, telegraphic simplicity, and so.
These treatment biased studies have been confined to analog designs which may clearly limit their generalization of this phenomena.
Are not all accounts biased and motivated to some extent, and so isn't the whole notion of objectivity put in doubt?