Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
Trotta: "Well, that's beside the point, whether she meant it or not."
Bjorn Thors's acrobatic performance is a virtuoso affair, but in the context of Kafka, theatrical virtuosity seems beside the point.
In a conclusion that is totally beside the point, the researchers offered that rock and pop stars really do set terrible examples for our nation's children.
In a conclusion that is totally beside the point, the researchers offered that stars really do set terrible examples for our nation's children.
All of which, Orr counters, is beside the point. Dembski never provides an adequate explanation as to why NFL theorems should apply to the co-evolution of organisms that adapt to a rapidly shifting array of viruses, predators, prey, and parasites.
That other Canadian bishops and archbishops have more or less publicly flouted the enforcement of these guidelines for decades is also beside the point. Generations of Anglican clergy, postulants, and members of religious communities have accepted the emotional sacrifices asked of them, and many continue to do so.
Whether they find the live tiger they fell in love with in stuffed form at the American Museum of Natural History is beside the point. They learn the power an animal can have on a peoples' consciousness and they guide readers on an enthusiastic exploration of some truly remote places with some truly memorable characters.
Although the kids often figure out the answer, that's almost beside the point. "I don't care if they get the answer," the teacher said.
Beinart acknowledges this distinction, but fails to recognize that it blows his case, and that it makes the opening anecdote--the analytical foundation--of his book puzzlingly beside the point.
For such critics, proof of various Founders' admiration for the Iroquois constitution was beside the point; they lined up to take shots at the idea without addressing or engaging the evidence.
With this in mind Robert Indiana's LOVE, 1966, is beside the point, and to include Verner Panton's environment Phantasy Landscape Visiona II, 1970, is to confuse psychedelic style with psychedelic politics; Panton's environment is groovy, but completely sanitized, and was never part of any collective project.
The songs all sound the same - even new ones - but that's beside the point.