ratio

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Ratio

The division of one piece of financial information by another. Financial ratios are very common in fundamental analysis, which investigates the financial health of companies. An example of a financial ratio is the price-earnings ratio, which divides a publicly-traded company's share price by its earnings per share. This and other ratios help analysts determine whether a company's share price properly reflects its performance.

ratio

The relation between two quantities when compared mathematically with one another. For example, the most frequently used ratio among investors is the price-earnings ratio. Financial analysts, investors, and managers use ratios to evaluate many factors such as the attractiveness of a stock or the operating efficiency of a company. Also called financial ratio. See also activity ratio, debt management ratio, liquidity ratio, profitability ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the improvement of their benefit-risk ratio represents both a current need and an ongoing challenge.
If the experiments have social value and are scientifically necessary, they will still not be ethical unless the risks are low enough to yield a favorable benefit-risk ratio. The benefits of the experiments, though significant, are probably not as high as the benefits of a clinical study on a new medical therapy.
Casey said, and has a highly desirable benefit-risk ratio." The approval also makes it possible for a patient to start and remain on an atypical antipsychotic, rather than starting on haloperidol or a benzodiazepine, then switching to treatment with oral ziprasidone.
Nor could it assess whether treating cancerfree women offers "a favorable benefit-risk ratio." There has not been long enough follow-up of the treated women to resolve this, Albain says.