Bema


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Bema

An ancient Greek unit of length approximately equivalent to 1.54 meters. It was also called a diploun bema.
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Soon thereafter, the company's name was changed to Bema Inc.
It said the Association advised Mr McNeely to resign as Christian Union president earlier this month but alleged he told BEMA officials he saw no reason to quit.
Brown: BEMA member companies are coming up with new ideas every day; ways to make equipment faster, safer, more energy efficient, require fewer personnel and less maintenance.
Designed by BEMA, the unique and sophisticated wrapping head can achieve very high pre-stretch ratios in the range of 300 to 450 percent that results in high-film savings.
In addition, Atrix will receive royalties on commercial sales of all BEMA products.
BEMA's director, John Whitlow, stated: "BEMA's core membership comprises small and medium sized manufacturing businesses in the South West.
But due to a trade show problem and personalities, the organization changed again to become BEMA, the Business Equipment Manufacturers Institute.
The Psalms of the Bema are the first group of psalms contained in Part II of the Manichaean Psalm-Book which was first published by C.
The Refugio Property is owned by Compania Minera Refugio (CMR) who have entered into a 50% joint venture with Bema Gold (Chile) Limitada (Bema).
Earlier this year, this giant accelerator produced an ion bema of record intensity, an important milestone on the road to inertial confinement fusion.
La representante du prefet, Kone Fatoumata, Secretaire generale 2 de prefecture et le chef de la delegation du ministere, Traore Bema, directeur de l'Enseignement technique, ont conseille aux futurs instituteurs adjoints la discipline, le gout du travail, la ponctualite et l'assiduite aux cours.
BeMA will be located adjacent the National Museum (Mathaf), a site made available by Universite Saint-Joseph that once corresponded to the Civil War era "Green Line," marking the division between east and west Beirut.