bells and whistles


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Sweetener

An extra incentive to encourage investors to buy a bond or preferred stock. For example, a bond may include a right to buy common stock in the issuer for 10% below its market value. A sweetener is designed to help sell securities. It is also called a kicker, a wrinkle, or bells and whistles.

bells and whistles

Special features that are added to ordinary investments to attract investors' attention. Examples of bells and whistles include put features on bonds and floating dividends on preferred stock. Often the value of the features is more apparent than real. Also called kickers, wrinkles.
References in periodicals archive ?
You might like Bing's general search performance, and you might enjoy its video preview, the way it handles flight schedules, or some other of its distinctive bells and whistles. As for me, I'm going to go back and spend more time with Ask.com.
These owners know that bells and whistles may entertain an audience for a while--but the excellent, long-term delivery of every service requires substance and stability.
For processors who don't need all those bells and whistles, Conair is offering the same chillers with its simpler microTrac 1 controller.
"This building will have a lot of the bells and whistles that companies are looking for," said Kim Morque, director of development for the Spinnaker Companies.
Once the basic elements are in place--design, payment options, security, and customer service--you can always add on the bells and whistles later.
One publisher cautioned that "there is a big difference between setting up a promotional web site" and getting "the bells and whistles" for your own site that will allow you to sell editorial content to non-subscribers online through a service provider.
All of the bells and whistles will be available to tenants of the park, from high-speed telecommunications in both wired and wireless forms, to high-capacity power for heavy users."
(Editor's note: No two publishers need or want the same "bells and whistles" when developing their web sites or making their editorial content available for sale online.